An extensive bibliography of papers related to research on and at the Gray Fossil Site. 

Bibliography

Abernethy, A.R., 2011. Extreme Variation in the Sagittal Crest of Tapirus polkensis (Mammalia Perissodactyla) at the Gray Fossil Site Northeastern TN. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Baskin JM, and Baskin CC. 2016. Origins and Relationships of the Mixed Mesophytic Forest of Oregon–Idaho, China, and Kentucky: Review and Synthesis 1. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 101(3):525-553. 

Baumgartner, K.A., 2014. Neogene climate change in eastern North America: a quantitative reconstruction. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Boardman GS. 2009. Salamanders of the Mio-Pliocene Gray Fossil Site, Washington County, Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Boardman GS, Schubert BW. 2011. First Mio-Pliocene salamander fossil assemblage from the southern Appalachians. Palaeontologia Electronica 14(2): p.16A. 

Bourque JR, Schubert BW. 2015. Fossil musk turtles (Kinosternidae, Sternotherus) from the late Miocene–early Pliocene (Hemphillian) of Tennessee and Florida. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 35(1):p.e885441. 

Brandon S. 2013. Discovery of bald cypress fossil leaves at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee and their ecological significance. Undergraduate honors thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Crowe CJ. 2017. Sciurids (Rodentia: Sciuridae) of the Late Mio-Pliocene Gray Fossil Site and the Late Miocene Tyner Farm: Implications on Ecology and Expansion of the Sciurid Record. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Czaplewski NJ. 2017. First report of bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) from the Gray Fossil Site (late Miocene or early Pliocene), Tennessee, USA. PeerJ, 5, p.e3263. 

Darcy HE. 2015. Additional research and taxonomic resolution of salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata) from the Mio-Pliocene Gray Fossil Site, TN. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

DeSantis LR, Wallace SC. 2008. Neogene forests from the Appalachians of Tennessee, USA: geochemical evidence from fossil mammal teeth. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 266(1):59-68. 

Doby J. 2015. A Systematic Review of the Soricimorph Eulipotyphla (Soricidae: Mammalia) from the Gray Fossil Site (Hemphillian), Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Doughty EM. 2016. Peccaries (Artiodactyla: Tayassuidae) from the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene Gray Fossil Site: Regional Implications with a Review of Tayassuinae. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Doughty EM, Wallace SC, Schubert BW, and Lyon LM. 2018. First occurrence of the enigmatic peccaries Mylohyus elmorei and Prosthennops serus from the Appalachians: latest Hemphillian to Early Blancan of Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee. PeerJ, 6, p.e5926. 

Drumheller SK. 2005. Paleoecologic and paleogeographic implications of a Hemphillian (7-4.5 Ma) snake assemblage in Washington County Tennessee. Undergraduate Senior Thesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 

Fulwood EL, and Wallace SC. 2015. Evidence for unusual size dimorphism in a fossil ailurid. Palaeontologia Electronica, 18(3):1-6. 

Gibson ML. 2011. Population Structure Based on Age-Class Distribution of Tapirus polkensis from the Gray Fossil Site Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Gong F, Karsai I, and Liu YSC. 2010. Vitis seeds (Vitaceae) from the late Neogene Gray fossil site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 162(1):71-83. 

Hawkins PL. 2011. Variation in the Modified First Metatarsal of a Large Sample of Tapirus polkensis and the Functional Implications for Ceratomorphs. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Huang YJ, Liu YS, and Zavada M. 2014. New fossil fruits of Carya (Juglandaceae) from the latest Miocene to earliest Pliocene in Tennessee, eastern United States. Journal of Systematics and Evolution, 52(4):508-520. 

Huang YJ, Liu YS, Wen J, and Quan C. 2015. First fossil record of Staphylea L. (Staphyleaceae) from North America, and its biogeographic implications. Plant Systematics and Evolution, 301(9):2203-2218. 

Hulbert RC, Wallace SC, Klippel WE, and Parmalee PW. 2009. Cranial morphology and systematics of an extraordinary sample of the late Neogene dwarf tapir, Tapirus polkensis (Olsen). Journal of Paleontology, 83(2):238-262. 

Jasinski SE. 2013. Fossil Trachemys (Testudines: Emydidae) from the Late Hemphillian of Eastern Tennessee and its implications for the evolution of the Emydidae. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Jasinski SE. 2018. A new slider turtle (Testudines: Emydidae: Deirochelyinae: Trachemys) from the late Hemphillian (late Miocene/early Pliocene) of eastern Tennessee and the evolution of the deirochelyines. PeerJ, 6, p.e4338. 

Jasinski SE, and Moscato DA. 2017. Late Hemphillian Colubrid Snakes (Serpentes, Colubridae) from the Gray Fossil Site of Northeastern Tennessee. Journal of Herpetology, 51(2):245-257. 

Jiang YL, and Liu YS. 2008. A simple and convenient determination of perylene preserved in the Late Neogene wood from northeastern Tennessee using fluorescence spectroscopy. Organic Geochemistry, 39(10):1462-1465. 

Jurestovsky, D.J., 2016. New Records of Colubrids from the late Hemphillian Gray Fossil Site of Northeastern Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Keenan SW, and Engel AS. 2017. Reconstructing diagenetic conditions of bone at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, USA. Palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology, 471:48-57. 

Keenan SW, Widga C, DeBruyn JM, and Schaeffer SM. 2018. Nutrient hotspots through time: A field guide to modern and fossil taphonomy in east Tennessee. In Geology at Every Scale: Field Excursions for the 2018 GSA Southeastern Section Meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee (Vol. 50, p. 61). Geological Society of America. 

Ketchum, W.A., 2011. Using Geographical Information Systems to Investigate Spatial Patterns in Fossils of Tapirus polkenis from the Gray Fossil Site, Washington County, Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Liu YSC, and Jacques FM. 2010. Sinomenium macrocarpum sp. nov. (Menispermaceae) from the Miocene–Pliocene transition of Gray, northeast Tennessee, USA. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 159(1-2):112-122. 

Maclaren JA, Hulbert Jr RC, Wallace SC, and Nauwelaerts S. 2018. A morphometric analysis of the forelimb in the genus Tapirus (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae) reveals influences of habitat, phylogeny and size through time and across geographical space. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 184(2):499-515. 

McConnell SM, and Zavada MS. 2013. The occurrence of an abdominal fauna in an articulated tapir (Tapirus polkensis) from the Late Miocene Gray Fossil Site, northeastern Tennessee. Integrative zoology, 8(1):74-83. 

Mead JI, Schubert BW, Wallace SC, and Swift SL. 2012. Helodermatid lizard from the Mio-Pliocene oak-hickory forest of Tennessee, eastern USA, and a review of monstersaurian osteoderms. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 57:111-121. 

Nave JW, Ali TA, and Wallace SC. 2005. Developing a GIS database for the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, based on modern surveying. Surveying and Land Information Science, 65(4):259. 

Noll NR. 2013. Systematics, climate, and ecology of fossil and extant Nyssa (Nyssaceae, Cornales) and implications of Nyssa grayensis sp. nov. from the Gray Fossil Site, Northeast Tennessee. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Oberg D. 2018. Fossil Moles from the Gray Fossil Site, TN: Implications for Diversification and Evolution of North American Talpidae. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Ochoa D, Whitelaw M, Liu YS, and Zavada M. 2012. Palynology from Neogene sediments at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, USA: Floristic implications. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 184:36-48. 

Ochoa D, Zavada MS, Liu Y, Farlow JO. 2016. Floristic implications of two contemporaneous inland upper Neogene sites in the eastern US: Pipe Creek Sinkhole, Indiana, and the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee (USA). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments 96(2):239-254. 

Parmalee PW, Klippel WE, Meylan PA, Holman JA. 2002. A late Miocene-early Pliocene population of Trachemys (Testundines: Emydidae) from east Tennessee. Annals Carnegie Museum 71:233–239. 

Samuels JX, Bredehoeft KE, and Wallace SC. 2018. A new species of Gulo from the Early Pliocene Gray Fossil Site (Eastern United States); rethinking the evolution of wolverines. PeerJ, 6:e4648. 

Short RA. 2013. A new species of Teleoceras from the Late Miocene Gray Fossil Site, with comparisons to other North American Hemphillian species. MS thesis, East Tennessee State University. 

Short RA, Wallace SC, and Emmert LG. 2019. A new species of Teleoceras (Mammalia, Rhinocerotidae) from the late Hemphillian of Tennessee. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, 56(5):183-260. 

Shunk AJ, Driese SG, Clark GM. 2006. Latest Miocene to earliest Pliocene sedimentation and climate record derived from paleosinkhole fill deposits, Gray Fossil Site, northeastern Tennessee, U.S.A. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 231:265-278. 

Shunk AJ, Driese SG, Dunbar JA. 2009. Late Tertiary paleoclimatic interpretation from lacustrine rhythmites in the Gray Fossil Site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Journal of Paleolimnology 42:11-24. 

Wallace SC, Wang X. 2004. Two new carnivores from an unusual late Tertiary forest biota in eastern North America. Nature 431:556-559. 

Wallace SC. 2011. Advanced members of the Ailuridae (lesser or red pandas–subfamily Ailurinae). In Red Panda (pp. 43-60). William Andrew Publishing. 

Whitelaw JL, Mickus K, Whitelaw MJ, and Nave J. 2008. High-resolution gravity study of the Gray Fossil Site. Geophysics, 73(2):B25-B32. 

Worobiec E, Liu Y, Zavada MS. 2013. Palaeoenvironment of late Neogene lacustrine sediments at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, U.S.A. Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae 83:51-63. 

Worobiec G, Worobiec E, and Liu YC. 2018. Fungal remains from late Neogene deposits at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, USA. Mycosphere, 9(5):1014-1024. 

Zobaa MK, Zavada MS, Whitelaw M, Shunk AJ, Oboh-Ikuenobe FE. 2011. Palynology and palynofacies analyses of the Gray Fossil Site, eastern Tennessee: their role in understanding the basin-fill history. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 308(3-4):433-444.